My take on the Curious Incident play

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Last Saturday I finally got to see The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time play in the West End. I say ‘finally’ because I have wanted to see it ever since I first read Mark Haddon’s book a few years ago and loved it. I was actually due to see the play a while ago in the West End but it was shortly after the roof collapsed in the theatre, so I’ve waited until now to see a captioned performance of it by STAGETEXT at a different theatre, the Gielgud Theatre.

Because the book is written in the first person from the point of view of Christopher, the main character, I did wonder how they would be able to convey on-stage the unique way he sees the world, and whether it would work or not. We are led to believe that Christopher has Asperger Syndrome, a form of autism, so because he is telling us the story, we see things through his eyes and we are introduced to his magical, brilliant, but altogether confused, mind.

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Christopher is a fifteen-year-old boy, who is brilliant at maths and needs everything to be logical and organised to be able to be calm and focused. When they’re not, which is quite often the case, he becomes overwhelmed and terrified, unable to function in a noisy, chaotic world, which is full of things and strange behaviour by other people, which he can’t make sense of.

The way that this was done on-stage was actually very clever. Siobhan, Christopher’s teacher from his special needs school, narrated his story from the book that he had written, at the same time as the actual acting of his story was taking place. It worked well and it was really convincing.

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Apart from being a good story, which was very well acted, the other brilliant thing about this production was the stage set. My wife, friend and I had excellent seats in the Dress Circle, facing right onto the stage, with the two STAGETEXT caption units perfectly placed at eye level to either side of us, so I could follow the dialogue really well.

The stage was designed like a giant geometric grid. At various points throughout the action, it would light up with bright colours, flash lots of numbers up or project different sets such as Paddington Station or London streets. Watching the stage sets change, sometimes with walls closing in, opening up or escalators suddenly appearing in the tube station, was like walking into a magical, fantasy world as Christopher’s almost psychedelic imagination is unleashed upon us.

I thought the actor, who played Christopher, Kaffe Keating, was very convincing. I read an article in the programme afterwards by the author of the original book, Mark Haddon, which I thought was really insightful. He talked about how Christopher describes himself as someone who has ‘Behavioural Problems’ because that is the term medical professionals have used to describe him. He says that labels like that tell us very little about the person who has been labeled and a lot about the people doing the labeling. In other words, often well-intentioned people are searching for the correct PC term to use to label a disabled person, instead of treating that person like an individual and trying to find out what they are like by just talking to them and getting to know them.

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Disabled people are all different and unique, just like any other group in society, so if someone asks whether Christopher is a correct representation of someone with autism, we shouldn’t really be asking that question. After all, he says, we wouldn’t ask if a character, who is a cellist, lesbian or archbishop, for example, are representative of those types of people, so why should we assume that people with a certain disability are representative of all people with that disability either?

The irony is that Christopher is labelled as having ‘Behavioural Problems’ when the adults around him, such as his father and mother, are dysfunctional and cause Christopher a lot of pain and suffering with their own behaviour. His father, for instance, played brilliantly by Nicholas Tennant, is unable to cope with Christopher or communicate well with him, so he goes from lying about his mother leaving him to try and save his feelings to lashing out at him from time to time through sheer frustration. Similarly, his mother left him to run off with the neighbour to London, partly because she is unable to cope with Christopher and deal with her emotions.

THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME
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Christopher can talk to people who aren’t close to him, though, such as his teacher Siobhan, as well as his kindly old neighbour Mrs Alexander. He also seems to have a special bond with animals, which he doesn’t have with people as he lacks empathy for them and can only see things in a simple, logical way. He obviously loved his neighbour’s dog Wellington, who we see has been brutally murdered at the beginning of the play. He also loves his pet rat Toby, who he insists on taking with him on his terrifying trip to London to try and find his mother.

I don’t want to give any more of the plot away for anyone who still hasn’t read the book or seen the play. Needless to say I thought this production was brilliant. It was very well acted and watching it was a real delight because the visuals, special effects and stage set were just incredible. It was definitely worth the wait. If you haven’t seen it yet, I’d definitely recommend it!

Curious Incident blog Christopher

 

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The Twelve Days of Christmas at the Chickenshed: a magical, inclusive adventure

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I never imagined that the Twelve Days of Christmas carol could take on a whole new meaning until I saw the Chickenshed theatre company’s performance of it in North London last week.

I went with a group of friends to the Chickenshed to see this captioned and BSL interpreted Christmas play. The storyline focuses on four children’s quest to find the fifth gold ring in the Twelve Days of Christmas carol, and during their journey, they come across all the characters from the carol in various scenes, such as two turtle doves and three French hens, in a crazy Alice in Wonderland type of adventure.

The performance was so colourful and surreal that at times I felt like I was in the middle of a gigantic bizarre Acid trip. The sheer energy and powerful emotion shown by the actors on stage and their huge supporting cast was electrifying and thrilling to watch.

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The set was also highly creative and magical. It was designed like a giant Willy Wonka-type slot machine, with the different numbers for the Twelve Days of Christmas flashing up to let the audience know when we had reached a specific number from the Twelve Days of Christmas.

This was definitely a unique production with a twist. None of the characters in the carol were how I remembered them or imagined them to be. For instance, the two male French hens spoke English with a French accent and confessed that they couldn’t speak French. The ’eleven pipers piping’ were shown as eleven plumbers dressed in boiler suits fixing the pipes in someone’s bathroom while he sat in his bathtub. Hilarious!

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I loved the crazy singing and dancing too. In one scene there was a ‘Strictly Formation Dancing’ ballroom dancing contest going on where the contestants were all amateurs and none of them could dance very well, so it all looked messy and chaotic, but very funny. Other scenes had circus acrobats, beautiful singing and fast, energetic dancing as the cast threw themselves across the stage.

What the Chickenshed really excels in though and makes them truly unique, is their totally diverse and inclusive ethos, which came across in bucket-loads in this production. Careful planning and attention to detail ensures that everyone in the audience and cast are included and made to feel part of their unique community.

They have a cast of more than 800 people in four different rotas, which includes children and adults of all ages, disabilities and ethnic backgrounds. No-one is excluded. In some scenes I saw about a hundred children, teenagers and adults crammed onto the stage. They all looked like they were having a great time. It was brilliant to watch and feel part of it.

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As well as being captioned in-house by the excellent captioner Beverley, there were two BSL interpreters on stage the whole time, who integrated their signing fully into the performance and interacted with the actors to tell the story in an effortless, seamless way. Their signing was beautiful to watch and because it is such a visual language, it added something extra to the performance, as well as making it totally accessible to the deaf people in the audience.

The show built up to a fabulous, show-stopper of a finale involving all the members of the cast on stage singing and dancing along to the lyrics of the Twelve Days of Christmas carol. The Rayne theatre, which was packed that night, was rocking as the audience clapped along to the lyrics of the song with the cast. At the end the entire cast were signing the words ‘A Partridge in a Pear Tree’ and as I looked around me, I saw children and families in the audience copying them and signing the lyrics. It was a heartwarming experience.

As I left the theatre that night, I had the lyrics ‘And a partridge, a partridge, a partridge in a pear tree’ ringing in my ears. Like a constant earworm that refused to go away, I had that tune ringing in my ears for days afterwards. That carol will never sound the same again.

Merry Christmas everyone!

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Wine tasting and fundraising: a perfect combination!

When I first found out about a wine tasting event for Action on Hearing Loss, I immediately thought this was my kind of event! I don’t claim to be any sort of wine expert, apart from enjoying drinking it, but finally here was a fundraising event that even I could manage.

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My usual experience of wine is buying whatever is on offer at my local supermarket, which is invariably hit and miss! I also liked the fact that this event wouldn’t involve me having to spend months training to run a marathon like my wife or having to climb up Mount Kilimanjaro. All I had to do was turn up, donate and enjoy a fun evening of drinking fine wine with great company. Right up my street!

So last Thursday evening I went along with my wife Joanna to the event in a wine bar in the beautiful, historic Leadenhall Market in the City. When we arrived there were quite a few people there I knew and it seemed a friendly, mixed group. There was also a BSL interpreter there to make it fully accessible for deaf people, and she was brilliant.

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After a welcoming glass of Prosecco, Neil, who was taking us through our wine tasting journey, introduced himself and started to talk to us about the first wine. Over the course of the evening, we tasted lots of white wines from different wine grape varieties, followed by lots of different red wines. He talked us through the history and descriptions of each one and its country of origin.

Thankfully, he told us we were supposed to throw out what was left of each wine in our glass before we moved onto the next one, as it was getting difficult to keep up!

Neil told me afterwards that he had worked in the wine trade for many years and had a real passion for wine, which had taken him to many interesting places around the world. He was involved in fundraising for deaf children through the NDCS but he wanted to fundraise for adults and share his passion and knowledge about wine with other people, while having a fun evening, at the same time. He approached Action on Hearing Loss about his idea of having a fundraising wine tasting event for them, and was delighted that they were really enthusiastic about it too. So that’s how the idea started.

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Neil also wanted to bring a group of people together without any barriers to enjoyment. He wanted it to be a fun, fully inclusive event. Anyone can enjoy wine tasting regardless as you don’t need to have your hearing to appreciate the tastes, smells and textures of the different wine varieties. The most important senses you need for it are those of taste and smell.

Many of us were also surprised at how much we enjoyed wines that we had dismissed before, perhaps due to our own prejudices about them or previous bad experiences of them. Neil had chosen the wine selection very well, I thought, and I was amazed to find that I enjoyed tasting most of them.

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I was particularly surprised how much I enjoyed the taste of the German Riesling. I had images of my parents drinking cheap Riesling wine in the 1970s, accompanied by an Abba soundtrack and flared trousers. Very retro! I remember the taste being particularly sweet and cloying, but the Riesling we tasted last week was crisp, dry and very drinkable.

I thought that Neil’s descriptions of the different tastes of the wine were really good too and they showed the complexity and depth of the flavours and colours of the different wines. I have never really got it when a wine expert talks about a wine tasting of damsons, plums or blackberries before but when he described it, I felt I really could start to appreciate the flavours.

I was also surprised to find out that I had enjoyed the Romanian wine, which I thought I would not like at all. Neil said that Romania was one of the biggest wine producing countries in Europe, which I had no idea about, and the wine we tasted was really subtle and pleasant.

It was great to chat to some really nice people in a friendly, relaxed atmosphere that night. Well done to Neil and Maddy from Action on Hearing Loss for putting in the hard work to organise such a great, fun event while raising money for the charity too. I hope there will be more events like this in the future!

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Time to act now on hearing loss

I felt honoured to be invited to the launch of Action on Hearing Loss’s ‘Hearing Matters’ report recently at the House of Commons. It was launched at a cross-party reception for MPs hosted by the MP Lillian Greenwood, a strong supporter of Action on Hearing Loss and advocate of their ‘SubtitleIt!’ campaign.

Lilian Greenwood

It was great to meet other deaf and hard of hearing people there who I have connected with on social media and who share a passion for campaigning on important issues affecting our lives such as improving the provision and access of subtitled video-on demand and catch-up TV services and trying to reverse NHS hearing aid cuts. It was also great to meet Lilian Greenwood and have a really good chat to the Labour MP Steve McCabe.

There are still so many barriers to access for deaf and hard of hearing people to lots of different areas in society, as well as employment and education and continued discrimination. We need to keep raising awareness of these issues among the wider public and campaign to improve them if we are to make a difference and strive for equality and inclusion in society.

The ‘Hearing Matters’ report is an important report, which covers lots of different areas related to hearing loss. It highlights the fact that by 2035 there will be one in five of us living with some form of hearing loss compared to one in six now.

Steve McCabe

They highlight how important it is, therefore, for our national government to work together with local authorities to implement local, community-based action plans to support people living with hearing loss.

I think it is wonderful that deaf and hard of hearing people from around the country have come together and got involved in Action on Hearing Loss’s recent campaigns, such as the ‘SubtitleIt!’ campaign and the campaign against NHS hearing aid cuts in North Staffordshire. It is amazing what we can all achieve together when we feel passionate about a common cause and empowered to do something about it.

Action on Hearing Loss is also involved in carrying out lots of medical research on hearing loss and tinnitus. I am particularly interested in what they are doing with the cochlear implant manufacturer AB to improve cochlear implant technology. From my personal perspective as a deafened adult, I feel incredibly lucky to have received a cochlear implant last year. It has been truly life-changing for me!

Without it, I would not be able to communicate with my family and friends like I can now. It has also given me the confidence to find work and do the job I’m doing now, which I feel really passionate about.

As our society ages, the problem of age-related hearing loss among the over 65s will only get worse and we need to take action and address it now before it is too late. We need to have more health screening programmes for the over 65s. We also need to think in a holistic way about how we can provide more community-based projects to support people living with hearing loss.

Hear to Meet

For instance, I work on the ‘Hear to Help’ service in my local Borough of Redbridge, run by Action on Hearing Loss. We support people living with hearing loss in my local community by showing them, their carers and family members how to maintain and care for their NHS hearing aids and how to communicate effectively with someone with a hearing loss.

I used to be a volunteer on this service for over four years before I was employed by them and I have seen the numbers of people we see grow over those years. It is still mainly run by trained volunteers, many of whom are hearing aid users themselves. As well as running regular drop-in hearing aid clinics, we also visit people in their homes, care homes and hospitals in the community.

Many older people suffering from hearing loss feel vulnerable and socially isolated. They find the support we give them invaluable. We help them get better use out of their hearing aids when they may be reluctant to wear them because they are not used to them or they don’t know how to maintain them.

We often see the same clients coming back to us regularly and telling us how much better they feel since we have helped them with their hearing aid problems.

Most of the clients we see have moderate hearing loss and before they had their hearing aids, they were struggling to communicate with their family and friends and felt reluctant to leave the house and socialise with other people as they felt isolated and vulnerable, missing out on everyday conversations. I can see how much they have improved and gained in confidence after accessing our ‘Hear to Help’ clinics.

This is why it is so important that older people living with hearing loss feel supported in their local community and are not denied the basic hearing aids they need on the NHS. North Staffordshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) has become the first CCG in the country to stop providing hearing aids to most people. Under the CCG’s new policy, people with mild hearing loss will no longer receive hearing aids and people with moderate hearing loss will have to pass an eligibility test to get them. Four other CCGs are proposing to follow in the steps of North Staffordshire, meaning the cuts could affect over 145,000 people.

Kate Green

These people have paid their national insurance all their lives and it is cruel that they are denied access to hearing aids when they really need them, which results in them being cut-off from their friends and family and excluded from society.

It is a very short-sighted approach, aimed at saving paltry amounts of money, but over the long-term it will end up costing our already overstretched NHS much more as a result of increased mental and physical health problems brought on by their untreated hearing loss, resulting in reduced wellbeing and a lower quality of life.

I really hope that more people read this important report and share it widely. We all need to take more action to improve equality and inclusion for deaf and hard of hearing people in our society.

Instead of cuts to funding and NHS hearing aid provision, we need more community-based support services and holistic approaches to stop more problems building up in the future as a result of not planning properly for our rapidly ageing population and adopting short-term thinking.

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Link to Action on Hearing Loss ‘Hearing Matters’ report:

http://www.actiononhearingloss.org.uk/supporting-you/policy-research-and-influencing/research/hearing-matters.aspx

 

Shakespeare meets Two-Tone at the Chickenshed

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I recently went to see a brilliant, totally unique captioned performance of Shakespeare’s ‘The Comedy of Errors’ at the Chickenshed theatre in North London.

I’ve seen quite a few different productions of Shakespeare plays over the last couple of years, but this was unlike any other I’ve seen. It was set in the late 70s/early 80s period of Two-Tone British Ska music. The actors were dressed in black and white suits with porkpie hats and kept breaking into songs by The Specials and Madness, while hurling themselves frenetically and dancing across the stage.

Listening to the cast singing songs I knew well from when I was at school, such as ‘Ghost Town’ and ‘Too Much Too Young’ took me back to the days of cheesy school discos or spinning around in a fairground Waltzer car singing my heart out to the sound of the Ska music being played in the background. Happy days!

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As soon as we arrived in the studio theatre, we were met with the cast walking around the small stage in front of us, shouting and demonstrating, holding up placards and protesting really noisily. They were interacting with the audience and seemed really fired up. I knew we would be in for something totally different that evening.

The studio theatre itself is really small and intimate. Being “in the round” and only seating about 40-50 people, it meant that I could see the faces of the audience clearly. They all looked delighted and surprised at the liveliness and energy of the actors running around the stage in a very physical way as the plot unfolded before them. Both the audience and the actors looked like they were having a lot of fun.

The plot is all about mistaken identity and the chaos and hilarity that results from that. It is a light Shakespearian comedy with the plot centred on two sets of twins separated at birth, who people confuse for the other one, and just to make it even more confusing, they each have manservants, who are also twins.

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There is also a merchant who has come in search of his son, who’s looking for his brother and mother, who were both lost at sea many years ago. To cut a long story short, the whole town called Ephesus ends up mistaking each for the other, but it all gets resolved in the end when the two sets of twins become reunited and the merchant finds his sons.

I was really grateful for the captioning done by the STAGETEXT captioner Bev so that I could follow the dialogue. I was there with my wife and some deaf and hard of hearing friends. We had great seats for reading the captions, which were directly opposite us. Even though there was a good hearing loop there I needed to read the captions too, especially because the dialogue was in old Shakespearian English and also because some of the characters had strong Caribbean accents, which were difficult to follow.

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My wife told me that she was following the captions too, because even though she can hear, she would have struggled to understand the language without the captions. I think many people in the audience found them helpful too.

The very young cast all gave brilliant performances. There were some great moments, such as the scene when the rather feisty, cherubic-looking Luciana, played by Sarah Connolly, was talking to her sister Adriana, played by Tessa Ryan, while doing her aerobics routine dressed in a 1980s Jane Fonda style leotard, tights and leg warmers with the song ‘Fame’ blaring out in the background.

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I love the friendly, relaxed atmosphere and the inclusive ethos at the Chickenshed. They train and support children and adults of all abilities and backgrounds to get involved in their company and productions. They don’t turn anyone down to become a part of their theatre company, which is totally inclusive to all, regardless of their ability. They also have a lot of volunteers, who willingly give up their time to help out and be part of the whole experience.

I have some deaf friends, who have been involved in the Chickenshed since they were small children. They have grown up with it playing a big role in their lives. It is like being part of a large extended family, which welcomes them and offers them hope and encouragement in a friendly, warm environment. It is theatre, which changes people’s lives by giving them the confidence and tools they need to go out into the world and pursue their dreams without being afraid of rejection or discrimination.

I left the theatre that night with a big smile on my face against the sound of the cast singing “Enjoy yourself” by The Specials ringing in my ears. Even the ushers were singing along to the catchy tune. It was brilliant that they had made Shakespeare so fun and accessible to all through this lively, Two-Tone production. It makes me want to dig out my old Specials and Madness albums and start reliving the soundtrack of my youth!

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Kevin Spacey as Clarence Darrow: spellbinding!

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I recently saw one of the finest, if not the finest, pieces of acting I have ever seen in my entire life!

It was Kevin Spacey playing Clarence Darrow at the Old Vic Theatre in London in the play of the same name.

I have always admired Kevin Spacey as an actor, ever since I first saw him in such amazing films as ‘The Usual Suspects’, ‘Seven’, ‘LA Confidential and ‘Swimming with Sharks’. At the moment, I’m completely hooked watching him play the evil, manipulative American politician Frank Underwood in the Netflix series ‘House of Cards’. He is without doubt one of the greatest actors of our time.

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My wife and I were both really excited at the prospect of seeing him perform live on stage and we couldn’t wait to see this play.

The Old Vic theatre is ‘in the round’ which makes for a cosy, intimate experience when you’re sitting in the stalls as we were, although I found it difficult at times to follow the captions and look at the stage at the same time. The hearing loop was excellent too, which is something that I am still getting used to.

This is a one-character play, so Kevin Spacey played the role of Clarence Darrow on his own for a full 90 minutes. His acting was fantastic! He owned the stage the entire time. I found myself being absolutely magnetised by his presence that night.

In real life Clarence Darrow was one of the greatest civil liberties lawyers in American history. In his forty-year career, he defended people who were poor, black and otherwise discriminated against by the American legal system in the early part of the twentieth century. He defended the underdog and people who couldn’t even afford to pay his legal fees, so he didn’t charge them. He was very courageous and had a strong sense of doing what he believed was right to defend innocent people.

Clarence Darrow placard

In his career, he managed to save 110 people from the gallows for being wrongly accused of murder. There was only one person he didn’t manage to save early on in his career, which he deeply regretted.

Kevin Spacey stood on the stage as the older Clarence Darrow preparing to pack up his office and retire. He was looking back on his life and career, telling it in his own words in a very humble but convincing way. It was totally mesmerising to watch him perform so passionately and emotionally just a few feet away from me. He walked around the stage and down the aisles, engaging with and bringing the audience with him as he talked about his most memorable cases and his personal life.

It must be so difficult to act on your own like that all the time and yet keep the audience so gripped. He seemed to totally involve us all in the story as he was telling it. I thought it was really clever the way he used tricks like speaking to empty chairs on the stage as if he were re-enacting his famous courtroom scenes and cross-questioning key witnesses and defendants in the trials and holding up evidence.

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Through his acting we got a glimpse of how eloquent, but humble, Clarence Darrow was, and how he managed to win over trial juries and judges by a combination of logic and his strong sense of right and wrong. Apparently, in real life he managed to reduce some trial judges to tears with his passionate pleas for them to save his defendants’ lives.

He was also courageous because he wasn’t afraid of standing up for what he believed in, even when this made him deeply unpopular. For instance, Spacey as Darrow told the audience about when he was asked to defend the McNamara brothers in 1911 by the American Federation of Labor (AFL). They had been charged with dynamiting the offices of the Los Angeles Times building a year before, which resulted in the deaths of twenty people. This trial attracted a lot of public attention, with the AFL setting up a defence fund from donations to defend the brothers and many people convinced of their innocence.

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But before the trial, when Darrow was going through the evidence, he discovered that the McNamara brothers were, in fact, guilty. He described how he didn’t know what to do as he was in such a moral dilemma. He eventually decided that the only right thing to do was to change their plea to guilty in order to spare the defendants’ lives and to plea for a custodial sentence instead. In the end, one of the brothers was imprisoned for fifteen years and the other got a life sentence.

Because of the change in plea, the ALF and other unions turned against Darrow, convinced that he had sold them out. He was also accused of bribing a member of the jury in the trial, which he denied strongly, but he faced a lengthy trial to defend himself of the bribery charge and although the jury did not find him guilty, he was forced to give up practising as a lawyer in California. It was only several years later that he decided to set up a practice again in another state, and he carried on defending people for many more years.

Clarence Darrow trial

Kevin Spacey’s performance was totally spellbinding. At the end the entire audience was on its feet applauding him and giving him a standing ovation. I have never seen such an audience reception in the theatre. After ten years of working as Artistic Director at the Old Vic, this is Spacey’s last season there, so I felt truly privileged to see him in one of his last performances.

I also came away feeling truly inspired by the legendary Clarence Darrow, who I had never heard of before, but I was really glad that I had discovered him. I know that times have changed since his day, but I wish that there were more people like him today who will always stand up for what they believe is right and fair, people who are never afraid to defend the poor, the vulnerable, the sick and disabled people in our society, particularly in this age of austerity and putting yourself first. People like him make our society a much fairer, better place.

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Total communication in action at Windsor Castle

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In many ways I feel incredibly lucky and grateful to have recently had a cochlear implant. I can hear and communicate so much better than before. I can now have a conversation with my wife and family, which was a real struggle for me before. That means the world to me.

But having a cochlear implant is not the miracle cure to deafness that some people think it is. As a late-deafened adult I have a very good knowledge of sound from before and I can hear much better now, but I cannot differentiate between all the different complexities and layers of sound. It is a world apart from hearing natural sound and I still struggle to hear, especially when there is any background noise.

When I go to the cinema or the theatre, for instance, I still always go to a captioned or subtitled performance, as I would struggle to follow it without them. I also use the hearing loops now with my cochlear implant, which is a new experience for me, as when I wore a hearing aid, they didn’t work for me at all.

Last year I went on a BSL and lipspeaking guided tour of Clarence House, organised by the Royal Collection. At the time I was profoundly deaf and was undergoing the assessment for a cochlear implant. Although I wore a hearing aid I was very reliant on the sign-supported English and lipspeaking provided by the interpreters. It was a brilliant tour and I really enjoyed it, but I still had to ask my wife Joanna to fill in the gaps to follow it, as my lipreading and signing was still limited.

Yesterday I was really excited to go on another BSL and lipspeaking guided tour of St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle. This was fully accessible to all deaf people. I have met Lesley, the lipspeaker, and Stephen, the BSL interpreter, before, at other events and they are both very passionate about full inclusion and access for deaf people. I was really pleased that they were providing the communication support.

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It was a very small group there, and I was lucky that Lesley was able to personalise my communication needs. Her lipspeaking was very clear and natural to me, and she also used some signing, which I could follow very easily. For me, it is important to be able to use “every tool in the box” when it comes to effective communication and working out the information given to me. It’s like putting together all the pieces of a jigsaw puzzle and just seeing bits of the picture until finally you can see the whole picture when you put together all the pieces you need.

Everyone is different when it comes to communication needs and preferences but for me, using total communication through a combination of listening with my cochlear implant and being supported by an interpreter like Lesley lipspeaking and signing, is the best way for me to follow people and understand the whole picture.

For instance, when we were in St George’s Chapel, there was a young organist practising on the organ really close to us. At first my heart sank and I wanted to ask him if he would mind stopping for a while as I was really struggling to hear over his beautiful, but noisy, choir music. The guide apologised for the organ music and carried on telling his interesting stories about the Chapel and its history.

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I was really lucky, though, that I could still follow what the guide was saying through Lesley’s clear lipspeaking and very visual language. Without her support, even with the cochlear implant, I would have struggled to follow anything and get the enjoyment that I did from his storytelling.

The tour of the grounds and St George’s Chapel was fascinating and I saw some beautiful, amazing things. I learned a lot about the history of the royal family, their connection to Windsor Castle and our own British heritage. I learned, for instance, about the origins of the Order of the Garter and its connection to Windsor Castle. King Edward II founded it in 1348 at Windsor Castle. By tradition, the Order takes its name from an occasion when King Edward picked up the Countess of Salisbury’s garter during a social ball, who had very embarrassedly dropped it, and he tried to make her feel better by tying it around his own leg.

The Order of the Garter is the most senior and the oldest British Orders of Chivalry and consists of the Sovereign and twenty-five Knights, who are made members because they have held public office, contributed in a particular way to public life, or served the Sovereign personally. The idea of rewarding chivalry and creating Knights was inspired by the legend of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table.

Windsor Castle blog_Queen Order of the Garter

St George’s Chapel is the spiritual home of the Order of the Garter, which is dedicated to the image and arms of St George, as the patron saint of England. Its motto is “Honi soit qui mal y pense” which means “Shame on him who thinks evil of it”. The Queen awards new members with their official garters at a special investiture ceremony held at Windsor Castle every year.

The Chapel is very old and incredibly beautiful. It has the widest Gothic arch in England and its stainglass windows are absolutely amazing. We walked into the choir stalls, which were stunning. I learned from the guide that the twenty-five stalls in the chapel all belong to the Knights and Ladies of the Garter. There have been some very famous Knights and Ladies in the past, such as Winston Churchill, Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Lord Mountbatten and the Kaiser.

Windsor Castle blog_St George's chapel

There are also 780 brass plates in the Chapel, each representing past and present Knights of the Garter. Each Knight has their own banner above their stall, with pictures representing them and their heraldry. They also have carvings of animal heads underneath the banners representing their heraldry. For instance, there were cricket balls and stumps on Lord Major’s banner, as he loves cricket, and a red stag’s head underneath representing his constituency of Huntingdon.

There are also ten British Kings buried in the chapel, including King Henry VIII and his third wife, Jane Seymour, and King Charles I. It was amazing to be standing next to Henry VIII’s plaque, with his remains buried underneath in the crypt. There is so much of our heritage steeped in this place, and I found it all fascinating, especially as the guides were so knowledgeable and entertaining. I also found out that the College of St. George had been founded at Windsor Castle in 1348, and today it still has 350 children boarding there from the age of three.

This was a great tour of Windsor Castle. I think that the Royal Collection provide some great tours of the Royal Palaces at a very reasonable price, which they make accessible to all deaf and hard of hearing people, taking all communication needs into account. We had a wonderful day and left with big smiles on our faces. For me, one of the best things about it was that everyone’s individual communication needs were met. I am really looking forward to their next event. I hope to see you there!

Link to Royal Collection website for future events with BSL interpreting and lipspeaking:

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/whatson?type=2183