Total communication in action at Windsor Castle

Windsor Castle header

In many ways I feel incredibly lucky and grateful to have recently had a cochlear implant. I can hear and communicate so much better than before. I can now have a conversation with my wife and family, which was a real struggle for me before. That means the world to me.

But having a cochlear implant is not the miracle cure to deafness that some people think it is. As a late-deafened adult I have a very good knowledge of sound from before and I can hear much better now, but I cannot differentiate between all the different complexities and layers of sound. It is a world apart from hearing natural sound and I still struggle to hear, especially when there is any background noise.

When I go to the cinema or the theatre, for instance, I still always go to a captioned or subtitled performance, as I would struggle to follow it without them. I also use the hearing loops now with my cochlear implant, which is a new experience for me, as when I wore a hearing aid, they didn’t work for me at all.

Last year I went on a BSL and lipspeaking guided tour of Clarence House, organised by the Royal Collection. At the time I was profoundly deaf and was undergoing the assessment for a cochlear implant. Although I wore a hearing aid I was very reliant on the sign-supported English and lipspeaking provided by the interpreters. It was a brilliant tour and I really enjoyed it, but I still had to ask my wife Joanna to fill in the gaps to follow it, as my lipreading and signing was still limited.

Yesterday I was really excited to go on another BSL and lipspeaking guided tour of St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle. This was fully accessible to all deaf people. I have met Lesley, the lipspeaker, and Stephen, the BSL interpreter, before, at other events and they are both very passionate about full inclusion and access for deaf people. I was really pleased that they were providing the communication support.

Windsor Castle blog_Lesley + Stephen

It was a very small group there, and I was lucky that Lesley was able to personalise my communication needs. Her lipspeaking was very clear and natural to me, and she also used some signing, which I could follow very easily. For me, it is important to be able to use “every tool in the box” when it comes to effective communication and working out the information given to me. It’s like putting together all the pieces of a jigsaw puzzle and just seeing bits of the picture until finally you can see the whole picture when you put together all the pieces you need.

Everyone is different when it comes to communication needs and preferences but for me, using total communication through a combination of listening with my cochlear implant and being supported by an interpreter like Lesley lipspeaking and signing, is the best way for me to follow people and understand the whole picture.

For instance, when we were in St George’s Chapel, there was a young organist practising on the organ really close to us. At first my heart sank and I wanted to ask him if he would mind stopping for a while as I was really struggling to hear over his beautiful, but noisy, choir music. The guide apologised for the organ music and carried on telling his interesting stories about the Chapel and its history.

Windsor Castle blog_St George's Chapel outside

I was really lucky, though, that I could still follow what the guide was saying through Lesley’s clear lipspeaking and very visual language. Without her support, even with the cochlear implant, I would have struggled to follow anything and get the enjoyment that I did from his storytelling.

The tour of the grounds and St George’s Chapel was fascinating and I saw some beautiful, amazing things. I learned a lot about the history of the royal family, their connection to Windsor Castle and our own British heritage. I learned, for instance, about the origins of the Order of the Garter and its connection to Windsor Castle. King Edward II founded it in 1348 at Windsor Castle. By tradition, the Order takes its name from an occasion when King Edward picked up the Countess of Salisbury’s garter during a social ball, who had very embarrassedly dropped it, and he tried to make her feel better by tying it around his own leg.

The Order of the Garter is the most senior and the oldest British Orders of Chivalry and consists of the Sovereign and twenty-five Knights, who are made members because they have held public office, contributed in a particular way to public life, or served the Sovereign personally. The idea of rewarding chivalry and creating Knights was inspired by the legend of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table.

Windsor Castle blog_Queen Order of the Garter

St George’s Chapel is the spiritual home of the Order of the Garter, which is dedicated to the image and arms of St George, as the patron saint of England. Its motto is “Honi soit qui mal y pense” which means “Shame on him who thinks evil of it”. The Queen awards new members with their official garters at a special investiture ceremony held at Windsor Castle every year.

The Chapel is very old and incredibly beautiful. It has the widest Gothic arch in England and its stainglass windows are absolutely amazing. We walked into the choir stalls, which were stunning. I learned from the guide that the twenty-five stalls in the chapel all belong to the Knights and Ladies of the Garter. There have been some very famous Knights and Ladies in the past, such as Winston Churchill, Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Lord Mountbatten and the Kaiser.

Windsor Castle blog_St George's chapel

There are also 780 brass plates in the Chapel, each representing past and present Knights of the Garter. Each Knight has their own banner above their stall, with pictures representing them and their heraldry. They also have carvings of animal heads underneath the banners representing their heraldry. For instance, there were cricket balls and stumps on Lord Major’s banner, as he loves cricket, and a red stag’s head underneath representing his constituency of Huntingdon.

There are also ten British Kings buried in the chapel, including King Henry VIII and his third wife, Jane Seymour, and King Charles I. It was amazing to be standing next to Henry VIII’s plaque, with his remains buried underneath in the crypt. There is so much of our heritage steeped in this place, and I found it all fascinating, especially as the guides were so knowledgeable and entertaining. I also found out that the College of St. George had been founded at Windsor Castle in 1348, and today it still has 350 children boarding there from the age of three.

This was a great tour of Windsor Castle. I think that the Royal Collection provide some great tours of the Royal Palaces at a very reasonable price, which they make accessible to all deaf and hard of hearing people, taking all communication needs into account. We had a wonderful day and left with big smiles on our faces. For me, one of the best things about it was that everyone’s individual communication needs were met. I am really looking forward to their next event. I hope to see you there!

Link to Royal Collection website for future events with BSL interpreting and lipspeaking:

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/whatson?type=2183

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